subject area
university type  
university status  
Cracow, Poland

Time Management

Language: English Studies in English
Subject area: economy and administration
University website: www.wse.krakow.pl/en/
Management
Management (or managing) is the administration of an organization, whether it is a business, a not-for-profit organization, or government body. Management includes the activities of setting the strategy of an organization and coordinating the efforts of its employees (or of volunteers) to accomplish its objectives through the application of available resources, such as financial, natural, technological, and human resources. The term "management" may also refer to those people who manage an organization.
Time
Time is the indefinite continued progress of existence and events that occur in apparently irreversible succession from the past through the present to the future. Time is a component quantity of various measurements used to sequence events, to compare the duration of events or the intervals between them, and to quantify rates of change of quantities in material reality or in the conscious experience. Time is often referred to as a fourth dimension, along with three spatial dimensions.
Management
Management is defined here as the accomplishment of desired objectives by establishing an environment favorable to performance by people operating in organized groups. Each of the managerial functions (planning, organizing, staffing, , directing, and controlling) is analyzed and described in a systematic way. As this is done, both the distilled experience of practicing managers and the findings of scholars are presented. This is approached in such a way that the reader may grasp the relationships between each of the functions, obtain a clear view of the major principles underlying them.
Harold Koontz and Cyril O'Donnell. Principles of Management; An Analysis of Managerial Functions. 1968, p. 1
Time
Spared and blessed by Time,
Looking tranquility.
Lord Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto IV. 146. Same expression used by William Congreve, Mourning Bride, Act II, scene 1, and by Charles Lamb, A Quaker's Meeting
Management
In the long-run the workman may be as necessary to his master as his master is to him, but the necessity is not so immediate.
Adam Smith (1776) The Wealth of Nations Chapter VIII, p. 80
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